Extending the Android Application class and dealing with Singleton

Source code

In this post I’m going to show the basic steps to extend the Android Application class and I’m also going to talk about why it could be useful to extend it in dealing with the Singleton design pattern.

The first thing to do is to create a MyApplication class that extends android.app.Application.

package com.devahead.extendingandroidapplication;

import android.app.Application;

public class MyApplication extends Application
{
	@Override
	public void onCreate()
	{
		super.onCreate();
		
		// Initialize the singletons so their instances
		// are bound to the application process.
		initSingletons();
	}

	protected void initSingletons()
	{
		// Initialize the instance of MySingleton
		MySingleton.initInstance();
	}
	
	public void customAppMethod()
	{
		// Custom application method
	}
}

In this class you can, for example, override the onCreate method to perform your initializations at the application startup and you can also implement your own methods to make them available to the rest of your application components. As you can see here we initialize also the singletons in case there are some in our application. I’ll talk later about why I do this here, but now let’s go on with the custom Application class.

The next thing we need to do is to open the AndroidManifest.xml file of our application and add a reference to MyApplication in the android:name attribute of the application tag, so in the end the manifest file will look similar to this one:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<manifest xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
	package="com.devahead.extendingandroidapplication"
	android:versionCode="1"
	android:versionName="1.0">

	<uses-sdk android:minSdkVersion="7"/>

	<application android:icon="@drawable/icon" android:label="@string/app_name"
		android:name="com.devahead.extendingandroidapplication.MyApplication">

		<activity android:name=".MainActivity"
			android:label="@string/app_name">
			<intent-filter>
				<action android:name="android.intent.action.MAIN"/>
				<category android:name="android.intent.category.LAUNCHER"/>
			</intent-filter>
		</activity>
	
	</application>
</manifest>

That’s it. We now have a custom Application class that can be used to suit our needs. We can access to it from any Activity through the getApplication method (the same getApplication method is available also in a Service).

package com.devahead.extendingandroidapplication;

import android.app.Activity;
import android.os.Bundle;

public class MainActivity extends Activity
{
	protected MyApplication app;
	
	@Override
	public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState)
	{
		super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
		setContentView(R.layout.main);
		
		// Get the application instance
		app = (MyApplication)getApplication();
		
		// Call a custom application method
		app.customAppMethod();
		
		// Call a custom method in MySingleton
		MySingleton.getInstance().customSingletonMethod();

		// Read the value of a variable in MySingleton
		String singletonVar = MySingleton.getInstance().customVar;
	}
}

As you can see there are references to the MySingleton class also here as an example like there were in the MyApplication class, but we haven’t seen the singleton yet, so here it is:

package com.devahead.extendingandroidapplication;

public class MySingleton
{
	private static MySingleton instance;
	
	public String customVar;
	
	public static void initInstance()
	{
		if (instance == null)
		{
			// Create the instance
			instance = new MySingleton();
		}
	}

	public static MySingleton getInstance()
	{
		// Return the instance
		return instance;
	}
	
	private MySingleton()
	{
		// Constructor hidden because this is a singleton
	}
	
	public void customSingletonMethod()
	{
		// Custom method
	}
}

The initInstance method lets the internal instance be initialized only once and this is done in the MyApplication class as we saw earlier. The getInstance method allows to access the instance from every part of our application and the MySingleton constructor is kept private because we don’t want to allow the creation of multiple instances.

At this point you may ask: "wait a moment… why is the singleton initialized in MyApplication??? Isn’t it supposed to be just a singleton so the instance can be initialized everywhere in the application like in an Activity?" Here comes the tricky part… I’ve been digging around the web and in books for a long time searching for information on the static variables lifecycle in Android because I found some weird behaviors when I started programming for Android, but unfortunately there seem to be different opinions about this topic, there is a bit of confusion and I still haven’t found a single definitive source of information.

If you know about the activities lifecycle in Android, you also know that they can be destroyed by the system in case they’re no more used and they’re not active or some resources are needed by the system, so it happens that during the life of an application, an activity could be destroyed and created many times, while the application process remains the same. While I was developing an application, I found that sometimes some static variables bound to activities happened to be uninitialized even though they’ve previously been initialized! I thought that when a static variable is initialized it stays so for the entire life of the application, but this doesn’t seem to be the case. Among all the information I found on the web, I tried to find out a safe and reliable way to initialize static variables (and you know that the singleton design pattern requires the use of a static variable). The explanation of the weird behavior I saw that makes more sense to me is that the static variables instances are bound to the class loader of the class that first initialized them. So what does this mean? This means that if a static variable inside any class has been initialized by an activity, when that activity is destroyed also its class might be unloaded and so the variable becomes uninitialized again! While if the variable is initialized by the application class, it’s life is the same as the application process so we’re sure that it will never become uninitialized again. That’s why I chose to initialize all the singletons in the MyApplication class.

I don’t know if the solution I found is correct and makes sense as it seems that this topic is not clear for many people dealing with Android and even the official documentation seems to make the people think that static variables are not problematic and behave exactly like we are used to in other environments with the Java virtual machine, but using the technique I explained actually solved my problems with static variables deinitialization and I never had the weird behaviors I was having when I was initializing them (as well as singletons) directly from my activities.

If someone found a better solution or doesn’t think this approach is correct, I would be happy to hear a different opinion. This is what the web is useful for and it’s interesting to read thoughts of experienced Android developers.

Comments

Arpeet Kale
Reply

Really helpful…!!
Thanks.

em
Reply

very good insight.

freetip
Reply

Your initialization and use of the singleton is not thread safe. Just thought I’d point that out. It’s also probably not worth using the Singleton pattern in this case, because you lose control of how references are handled within the lifecycle of your application. You can probably just initialize a reference to the class within your custom Application class, make it static, and use it from there. It’ll be faster, easier, thread-safe, and you keep control of all references (and thus more predictable garbage collection).

If you insist on using a singleton, you can probably initialize it statically upon first reference to the class instead of lazily like how you’re doing it now.

Aaron
Reply

Freetip: so is this a better solution?

public class MyApplication extends Application
{
private static MyDataModel mMyDataModel;

public void onCreate()
{
super.onCreate();
mContentModel = new MyDataModel();
}

public MyDataModel getMyDataModel()
{
return mMyDataModel;
}

Andrea Bresolin
Reply

@freetip

Making the singleton’s methods thread-safe depends on the specific usage of them across the application. If the singleton is used by a single thread at a time (like by the active activity in its UI thread) you don’t need the synchronization, otherwise if multiple threads are accessing the singleton’s methods, then you’ve got to make sure they’re properly synchronized, but the way you synchronize them really depends on the specific usage in the application. The initialization of the singleton through its initInstance() method is actually thread-safe because that method is called only by the MyApplication class when the app is created (onCreate() method) in that single thread and nowhere else in the application. The getInstance() method of the MySingleton class is thread-safe as well because it just returns the instance and that instance is never modified in the application after its initialization. The singleton instance is just one and will live as long as the application process is alive. Since I made that instance bound to the MyApplication class, as I explained in the post, it will never be garbage collected during the application’s life and when the app is closed and destroyed by the system I won’t need anymore the singleton instance so everything will be garbage collected.

@Aaron

With that solution you can access the MyDataModel instance only if you’ve got a reference to the MyApplication class instance. You have that reference inside activities for example, but you might not have it inside other classes, while you could still use the singleton in those classes. The singleton pattern is often criticized, but I think that deciding to use it or not really depends on your specific needs and how you want your app to be structured. If you only need to access some instances through a reference to the MyApplication class instance, of course you could avoid using singletons.

Thanks to both for the comments. What I presented here is my vision and I might be wrong of course, so hearing other opinions is always interesting.

Pkmmte Xeleon
Reply

What if I have variables in the Singleton class?
The tutorial you made shows how to read the variable’s value but not how to assign in. That gets me confused a little.

Pkmmte Xeleon
Reply

Please ignore my last comment, it was a simple mistake.
What I would like to know is why my app crashes whenever I implement a simple custom method from the Singleton class.

For example, if I want to set a specific value from my Settings class to static variable located in the Singleton class, I use the following method:

public void setPressureUnit(int u){
PressureUnit = u;
}

However, the app always crashes upon visiting the Settings Activity due to this method.

Andrea Bresolin
Reply

@Pkmmte I don’t know what could be the reason. Could you please post the stack trace that you get in LogCat in Eclipse when your app crashes?

Egor
Reply

Very interesting… Thanks for sharing!

But what up with “final static” ones? Do they also comes to nowhere if activity dies?

Andrea Bresolin
Reply

I usually use “final static” for constant values initialized inline, basically something like

public final static String STATIC_CONST_VAR = "The value";

so they’re not a problem since the value is there, no matter if the activity is destroyed and the class is unloaded or not.

In another case like this

public static String staticVar = "The value";
public final static String STATIC_CONST_VAR = staticVar;

STATIC_CONST_VAR is still initialized with the class and its value is “The value”. Even if later in the code I change the value of staticVar

staticVar = "The new value";

STATIC_CONST_VAR still keeps the original value, so I think a “final static” is not a problem.

KCN
Reply

I’ve been struggling with a problem with singletons getting destroyed when activities are destroyed when other apps take the foreground. Like you, I thought singletons with no GUI/OS references would remain in memory unchanged. Appearantly I was in err. I’ll try your methods first thing Monday!

Andrea Bresolin
Reply

@KCN I hope this will be useful also for you. If you want, let me know if the technique I presented in this post actually solved your problems with singletons.

KCN
Reply

@Andrea – Yes, the boss-man (who was having the app crash after using the camera to get images) just confirmed it returned and worked. The app crashed a few moments later but that is a different topic.
Thank you for your post and insight!

KCN
Reply

I need a bit of elaboration on this line:
“…the static variables instances are bound to the class loader of the class that first initialized them. …”
SO, I have an initial reference to a Singleton in my class derived from Application. Then, later in an activity I need to fill the singleton with data. Can I safely do this by getting a reference to the singleton in a local variable, or do I need to add functions to the application and do all this through the application instance?
MySingle mySingle = MySingle.getMySingle().putData(data)
or
((MyApp)getApplication())getGlobalMySingle().putData(data)
where getGlobalMySingle is defined within the application-derived class to point to the global singleton. Does my question make sense?

Andrea Bresolin
Reply

@KCN With “…the static variables instances are bound to the class loader of the class that first initialized them…” I mean that it’s just important that your custom Application class is the one that creates the instance of your singleton so it will live as long as the Application class lives (create the singleton instance in the Application‘s onCreate method). Later in your code, you can safely refer to the singleton with MySingleton.getInstance() without going through the Application class and assign new values to all the singleton’s member variables (through methods like your putData or accessing the public fields directly). You can also store the instance of your singleton in a local variable with MySingleton singletonInst = MySingleton.getInstance(); and then use the singletonInst variable to work with the singleton because the original instance is still the same (this is just a reference) and it has been created by your custom Application class.

Andrea Bresolin
Reply

@Pascal Welsch That’s the problem. You can access the Application instance with a call to getApplicationContext() in classes derived from Context (like an Activity or a Service for example), but you cannot easily have a reference to the Application object from other classes, while you can easily access a singleton instance everywhere. If you need a reference to the Application instance inside a class that is not derived from Context, you would have to pass that reference as a parameter to the class instance itself or to its methods that might need it. As you can understand, passing a reference to the Application instance to potentially hundreds classes/methods that need it to access global state data, instead of simply using singletons, is not really practical. And you would also end up putting everything inside your custom Application class instead of creating a modular app structure with multiple singletons. In fact, the Application class is your main entry point for an Android app, like it would be with the file containing the main() method in a Java or C++ desktop application (and in many other programming languages as well). You could do the same also with Java or C++ in a desktop application: create, in the main() method, an object of a class that contains all the global state data and pass a reference to it to all the classes/methods that need it while the application runs. This would avoid using static fields because we are basically keeping all the data in our custom object that will be alive as long as the application runs. In this scenario static fields could not be useful at all in a programming language because we could replace them with our own custom logic passing a reference to our global state object everywhere. If you read the comments to your StackOverflow link, you’ll find also this one http://stackoverflow.com/questions/708012/android-how-to-declare-global-variables?answertab=votes#comment12583918_708317 and as you can see even the official Android documentation says that singletons can provide a modular structure that should be preferred to the storage of data or custom methods in an Application class instance. Of course both the approaches would technically work, it’s just a different way of structuring the code that could result in a substantial difference and maintainability as soon as the app size grows with more and more classes and methods that need access to the global state data.

David
Reply

When would you use a method in the Application verses a method in the Singlton? Would Singleton methods be used to edit variables stored in the singleton and Application methods be used to perform background tasks?

Nizzy
Reply

You can’t pass args to constructor of MySingleton in this example from MainActivity, because you call the initInstance() from MyApplication.

Karthik B
Reply

Can I modify your getInstance() method as
public static MySingleton getInstance() {

if (instance == null) {
// Create the instance
instance = new MySingleton();
return instance;
}else {
// Return the instance
return instance;
}
}

and eliminate the method initInstance()

Andrea Bresolin
Reply

@Karthik The purpose of the initInstance() method is to make sure that the singleton instance is initialized inside the Application class.

Igor Ganapolsky
Reply

@Andrea Great article. However, you said the following:
“I found that sometimes some static variables bound to activities happened to be uninitialized even though they’ve previously been initialized!”

That is because you didn’t create global variables (public static). I believe if you had made the variables truly global, they would not be killed (garbage-collected) until the application process is killed by the system. The fact that Android can destroy your activities and relaunch your app is irrelevant. What’s important is keeping an eye on the life of your application’s process, which you can do with multiple system apps from Google Play store.

Muhammad Ali Rafique
Reply

Igor Ganapolsky Your answer is better solution for static variables i just tested by log info that public static variables are not deinitialized on activity recreation.
But this pots (Original ) is also much helpful… Thanks both of you

erik
Reply

What’s is wrong with this:

public class Application extends android.app.Application {
private static Application instance;
public static Application getInstance() {
if (instance == null)
throw new IllegalStateException();
return instance;
}

// move all logic from MySingleton to here…
}

Gamer
Reply

But do you need a Singleton class if you already extend application? You can put all your global variables and method in MyApplication because it works like a singleton.

Vu Van Hung
Reply

Thanks for share.
Realy helpful!

Nandkishore
Reply

I needed a functions and few data to be available in my applications everywhere to be accessible not just in Activity. So I decided to use this approach. Pasting all my code here. I am presenting this solution for android.content.res.Resources acess but this can be extended to acess any custom data and classes as well.

package com.example.global;

import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Map;

import android.content.res.Resources;

public class AppService implements AppServiceInterface {

Map serviceMap;

private AppService(HashMap serviceMap) {
this.serviceMap=serviceMap;
}

/**
* This will lookup the internally lookup service object and return the
* appropriate service
*
* @return Resource
*/
public static Resources getAppResources() {
return SingletonHolder.INSTANCE.getResources();
}

@Override
public Resources getResources() {
AppServiceInterface resourceService = serviceMap.get(ServiceLookupImpl
.getServiceName(ServiceLookupConstants.APPLICATION_RESOURCES));
if (resourceService == null) {
resourceService = ServiceLookupImpl
.getServiceClass(ServiceLookupConstants.APPLICATION_RESOURCES);
serviceMap
.put(ServiceLookupImpl
.getServiceName(ServiceLookupConstants.APPLICATION_RESOURCES),
resourceService);
}
return resourceService.getResources();
}

private static class SingletonHolder {
private final static AppServiceInterface INSTANCE = new AppService(new HashMap());
}

}

public interface AppServiceInterface {

/* (non-Javadoc)
* @see com.example.global.AppServicesInterface#getResources()
*/
public abstract Resources getResources();

}
This is the singleton class that from which you would be accessing your all data. Deosn’t matter if this class gets destroyed and serviceMap can be created and repopulated again.

package com.example.global;

import java.lang.reflect.InvocationTargetException;
import java.lang.reflect.Method;

import android.app.Application;
import android.content.res.Resources;
import android.util.Log;

import com.example.R;
import com.example.global.AppResources.OnResourceAccessListener;

public class AppServicesInitialisation extends Application implements OnResourceAccessListener {

@Override
public void onCreate() {
super.onCreate();
// Initialize the singletons so their instances
// are bound to the application process.
initSingletons();
}

private void initSingletons() {
String[] classNames = getResources().getStringArray(R.array.appServiceClassNames);
for (int index = 0; index < classNames.length; index++) {
try {
String className = ServiceLookupConstants.PACKAGE_NAME + classNames[index];
final Class clazz = Class.forName(className);
final Method declaredMethod = clazz.getDeclaredMethod(“getInstance”, null);
declaredMethod.setAccessible(true);
Object object = declaredMethod.invoke(null, null);
AppServiceInterface appService = (AppServiceInterface)object;
if(ServiceLookupConstants.APPLICATION_RESOURCES_SERVICE_NAME.equals(classNames[index])){
final Method method = clazz.getDeclaredMethod(getString(R.string.app_resources), new Class[]{OnResourceAccessListener.class});
method.setAccessible(true);
method.invoke(object, (OnResourceAccessListener)this);
}

} catch (ClassNotFoundException e) {
// TODO Auto-generated catch block
e.printStackTrace();
} catch (IllegalArgumentException e) {
// TODO Auto-generated catch block
e.printStackTrace();
} catch (IllegalAccessException e) {
// TODO Auto-generated catch block
e.printStackTrace();
} catch (InvocationTargetException e) {
// TODO Auto-generated catch block
e.printStackTrace();
} catch (NoSuchMethodException e) {
// TODO Auto-generated catch block
e.printStackTrace();
}
}
Log.d(“AppServicesInitialisation”, “service initialised”);
}

public Resources onResourceAccess() {
return getApplicationContext().getResources();
}

}

This class extends the Application and it will be responsible for creating all Singletons.
Also you can attach a Listener to it if you want it to be notified when the Singletons are accessed or take any actions.

Singleton Class below:

package com.example.global;

import android.content.res.Resources;

public class AppResources implements AppResourcesInterface {

private OnResourceAccessListener resourceAccessListener;

private AppResources(){}

private static class SingletonHolder {
private final static AppResourcesInterface INSTANCE = new AppResources();
}

public static synchronized AppResourcesInterface getInstance() {
return SingletonHolder.INSTANCE;
}

@Override
public Resources getResources(){
Resources resources = resourceAccessListener.onResourceAccess();
return resources;
}

@Override
public void setResourceAccessListener(OnResourceAccessListener resourceAccessListener) {
this.resourceAccessListener = resourceAccessListener;
}

public interface OnResourceAccessListener {
public Resources onResourceAccess();
}
}

And the Interface
package com.example.global;

import com.example.global.AppResources.OnResourceAccessListener;

public interface AppResourcesInterface extends AppServiceInterface {

public abstract void setResourceAccessListener(OnResourceAccessListener resourceAccessListener);

}

Note: This extends AppServiceInterface which is implemented by class public class AppService which enforces AppService to implement
those methods and expose it to be used in all your classes.

package com.example.global;

/**
* @author
*
*/
public class ServiceLookupConstants {

/**
*
*/
public static final int APPLICATION_RESOURCES = 1;
public static final String APPLICATION_RESOURCES_SERVICE_NAME = “AppResources”;
public static final String PACKAGE_NAME = “com.example.global.”;

}

package com.example.global;

import java.lang.reflect.InvocationTargetException;
import java.lang.reflect.Method;

/**
* @author
*
*/
public class ServiceLookupImpl {

/**
* @param serviceId
* @return AppServicesInterface
*
*/
@SuppressWarnings(“rawtypes”)
public static AppServiceInterface getServiceClass(int serviceId) {
AppServiceInterface serviceClass = null;
switch (serviceId) {
case ServiceLookupConstants.APPLICATION_RESOURCES:
try {
String className = ServiceLookupConstants.PACKAGE_NAME + getServiceName(serviceId);
final Class clazz = Class.forName(className);
final Method declaredMethod = clazz.getDeclaredMethod(“getInstance”, null);
declaredMethod.setAccessible(true);
Object object = declaredMethod.invoke(null, null);
serviceClass = (AppServiceInterface)object;
} catch (ClassNotFoundException e) {
// TODO Auto-generated catch block
e.printStackTrace();
} catch (IllegalArgumentException e) {
// TODO Auto-generated catch block
e.printStackTrace();
} catch (IllegalAccessException e) {
// TODO Auto-generated catch block
e.printStackTrace();
} catch (InvocationTargetException e) {
// TODO Auto-generated catch block
e.printStackTrace();
} catch (NoSuchMethodException e) {
// TODO Auto-generated catch block
e.printStackTrace();
}
break;
default:
}

return serviceClass;
}

/**
* @param serviceId
* @return String- serviceName
*/
public static String getServiceName(int serviceId) {
String serviceName = null;
switch (serviceId) {
case ServiceLookupConstants.APPLICATION_RESOURCES:
serviceName = ServiceLookupConstants.APPLICATION_RESOURCES_SERVICE_NAME;
break;
default:
}
return serviceName;
}
}

res/values/appServices.xml contains the name of all Singletons Class and methods to be accessed.

AppResources

setResourceAccessListener

EXAMPLE HOW TO ACCESS the SINGLETON LOOK AT THE METHOD public String getPageTitle(int position)

package com.example.adapter;

import java.util.Locale;

import android.content.res.Resources;
import android.support.v4.app.Fragment;
import android.support.v4.app.FragmentManager;
import android.support.v4.app.FragmentPagerAdapter;

import com.example.R;
import com.example.activity.fragment.LoginFragment;
import com.example.activity.fragment.LoginFragmentInterface;
import com.example.global.AppService;

/**
* A {@link FragmentPagerAdapter} that returns a fragment corresponding to
* one of the sections/tabs/pages.
*/
public class SectionsPagerAdapter extends FragmentPagerAdapter {

public SectionsPagerAdapter(FragmentManager fm) {
super(fm);
}

@Override
public Fragment getItem(int position) {
// getItem is called to instantiate the fragment for the given page.
LoginFragmentInterface fragment= null;
switch(position) {

case 0:
fragment = new LoginFragment();
fragment.setPosition(position);
break;
case 2:
fragment = new LoginFragment();
fragment.setPosition(position);
break;
default:
fragment = new LoginFragment();
fragment.setPosition(position);
break;
}

return (Fragment)fragment;
}

@Override
public int getCount() {
// Show total pages.
return 3;
}

@Override
public String getPageTitle(int position) {
Resources resources = AppService.getAppResources();
String[] landingTabTitles = resources.getStringArray(R.array.landing_tab_titles);
Locale l = Locale.getDefault();
if(landingTabTitles != null){
return landingTabTitles[position].toUpperCase(l);
} else {
return resources.getString(R.string.landing_tabs_display_error);
}
}

}

The advantage you getting here is you are not calling Singletons methods and classes anywhere so if you want to replace the Singleton class with any other Class then you just need to change the xml so that way your code is loosely coupled to all the Singleton classes.

Nandkishore
Reply

res/values/appServices.xml contains the name of all Singletons Class and methods to be accessed.
xml file was not posted properly reposting it.
<!–

AppResources

setResourceAccessListener
–>

Nandkishore
Reply

res/values/appServices.xml contains the name of all Singletons Class and methods to be accessed.
xml file was not posted properly reposting it hopefullt this time -)

AppResources

setResourceAccessListener

Nandkishore
Reply

Apologies for repopsting ti so many times now I have removed all the tags and psoting just the string so you would have an idea how it should be
res/values/appServices.xml contains the name of all Singletons Class and methods to be accessed.

resources
string-array name=”appServiceClassNames”
item AppResources item
string-array
string name=”app_resources” setResourceAccessListener string
resources

Larry
Reply

I struggled with this problem as well and after a lot of research I have come to the following conclusions. The Android OS will NOT discard static data, singletons, etc. The only action Android will do is discard Activities, since activities can be recreated easily. It doesn’t make sense that random static variables or classes will be discarded.

When your application is in the background, and the OS needs memory, it will shut down activities and recreate them when you bring the app to the foreground again. If memory is low, it may kill your application all together (reclaims all the memory including the application class). At this point, all your static data is gone as well (obviously).

If within about 30 minutes of this occurring, you select your app again, the OS will attempt to put it back where it was when it was killed. It will recreate the application (and hence run the OnCreate() in the application Class) and then restart the Activity which was visible when you put the app in the background earlier. It does not recreate the activity stack – only the last activity that was visible. So, if you initialize your singleton Class in the Application class, it should work fine. But if your initialize data in your singleton Class in say the first activity that starts the app (Main_activity for example), then that static data will NOT be there.

You will need to check in each activity onCreate() if the singleton is there and initialized. If not, you should restart your app by starting the Main_Activity again.

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Reply

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Reply

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sruthi
Reply

Should you have getters and setters for customVar inside your MySingleton class? In Singleton I initialised public String customVar = “test”; My app crashes on this line: String singletonVar = MySingleton.getInstance().customVar;

fax
Reply

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sites
Reply

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carpinteyrokbq
Reply

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A classy looking round clock is located in between the center air vents. The front bucket seats are broad, comfortable and have moderate side bolstering. The center console is wide and it provides a large central storage area.

IANA cook, health nut or otherwise culinary educated. I have been trying to live healthy for the last couple of years though. I’ve been mostly lurking on a bunch of forums and the concensus seems to be that a reasonably balanced diet of meat/vegies is ok.

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cn6apiwx
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Ugg è diventato Molto Popolare in tutto il mondo il marchio Internazionale.è proprio a causa di Ugg Pelli ovine materiale Incredibile e confortevole vantaggio in funzione Quando l’esperienza emotiva di questo Amore, Solo che si estende Fino ad Oggi, in tutto il mondo.In breve, mettiti le scarpe e stivali Ugg, Hai tutto sarebbe a proprio Agio.
- JI (autunno – inverno 2013 Ugg Australia) borse di serie di vacanza con Rosso, Viola, Blu, come il Festival di Luci come splendido Colore di esprimere l’Amore per la vita.- JI (Ugg Australia) Holiday Borse Serie sceglie con tessuto di velluto o con le Paillette tradizionali di Alta qualità di Lana di spazzare via la Pelle, l’inverno di accessori e pesante tradizionale Senso di che umore Cupo, di saltare.Festival di respiro emana Gioia Rosso, Pieni di lustrini Borsa Borsa sulla Spalla di lusso respiro di Pelliccia d’inverno, caldo caldo umore di trasmettere.
La Nostra Pelle pieno di materiale Silkee di cromo in vantaggio… Sole e di Colore, in un Processo di Processo di protezione Scotchgard ? Cuoio impermeabile, sudore, vanno ad alta permeabilità caratteristica può aiutarti a preparare la risposta perfetta Tempo umido Porta Guai.
- JI (Ugg Australia nel 2013 l’autunno e l’inverno in vacanza) accessori di Serie, gli stivali, – di cotone trapunta in portachiavi, guardando alle coppie di lustrini “Mini” Gli stivali e un peluche – di cotone, il Cuore di una Grande sensazione di calore, come se la sente in Anticipo le vacanze del respiro.
Ugg Australia alla conferenza di Primavera 2012 Mostra uomini e Donne scarpe per Bambini, scarpe, accessori e Cinque in Primavera e in Estate, La Nuova serie di Borse.

gs6lqvuz
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1. Materiale
con un’ottima comodita ‘, Rosalie è un Mix di STILI DI giocare la fusione di una consistenza di lusso, la Pelle e La Tela di materiale e di Bootleg, in parte con la Cintura di chiusura Lampo, e Tra un po’ i dettagli, Tempo Libero e Delicato Stile compatibile con Le donne.
La Nostra Pelle pieno di materiale Silkee di cromo in vantaggio… Sole e di Colore, in un Processo di Processo di protezione Scotchgard ? Cuoio impermeabile, sudore, vanno ad alta permeabilità caratteristica può aiutarti a preparare la risposta perfetta Tempo umido Porta Guai.
Ugg Australia non è in PARTICOLARE gli stivali in un marchio, che in realtà è la Produzione di stivali di Pelli Ovine, collettivamente, stivali di Pelli ovine della marca e di produttore è un po ‘ovunque,
Il diritto di indossare l’Attenzione

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